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Outcomes / Impacts

November 2, 2012

Miki Mistrati claims his film, The Dark Side of Chocolate, has coaxed major chocolate makers out of their apathy towards the use of trafficked children in cocoa plantations.
(Source: Responsible Cocoa, 2011, Link )

“Ending these practices begins with changing traditional farming methods – many of which have been conducted for more than 100 years. We collectively have spent more than $75 million and support nearly 40 programmes throughout West Africa”
(Source: Responsible Cocoa, 2011, Link )

“Our belief is that no child should ever be harmed in the farming of cocoa. In addition to industry programme, we remain committed to support government and our global partners in the pursuit of sustainable cocoa farming, helping farmer, families and children achieve a better life.”
(Source: Responsible Cocoa, 2011, Link )

In September 2010 a new Framework of Action partnership agreement was created between the US Department of Labour, ILO and industry. The global chocolate and cocoa industry has made an immediate pledge to commit $7 million to further the goals of the Harkin-Engle Protocol and the Frameowrk of Action.
(Source: Responsible Cocoa, 2011, Link )

“Achieving this objective is possible only through partnership among the major stakeholders: governments, global industry (comprised of major manufacturers of cocoa and chocolate products as well as other major cocoa users), cocoa producers, organised labour, non-governmental organisations, and consumers. Each partner has important responsibilities.”
(Source: Chocolate Manufacturers Association, 1999, Link)

“Industry recognizes the ILO’s unique expertise and welcomes it’s involvement in addressing this serious problem. The ILO must have…an active role in assessing, monitoring, reporting on, and remedying the worst forms of child labour in the growing and processing of cocoa beans and their derivative products.”
(Source: Chocolate Manufacturers Association, 1999, Link)

“Industry has publically acknowledged the problem of forced child labour in West Africa and will continue to commit significant resources to address it. West African nations also have acknowledged the problem and have taken steps under their own laws to stop the practice.”
(Source: Chocolate Manufacturers Association, 1999, Link)

“By December 1, 2001, a joint statement made by the major stakeholders will recognize, as a matter of urgency, the need to end the worst forms of child labour in connection with the growing and processing of West African cocoa beans and the derivative products and the need to identify positive developmental alternatives for the children removed from the worst forms of child labour.”
(Source: Chocolate Manufacturers Association, 1999, Link)

“By July 1, 2002, industry will establish a joint international foundation to oversee and sustain efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labour in the growing and processing of cocoa beans and their derivative products.”
(Source: Chocolate Manufacturers Association, 1999, Link)

“the industry in partnership with other major stakeholders will develop and implement credible, mutually-acceptable, voluntary, industry-wide standards of public certification, consistent with applicable federal law, that cocoa beans and their derivative products have been grown and/or processed without any of the worst forms of child labour.”
(Source: Chocolate Manufacturers Association, 1999, Link)

“INTERPOL’s first ever police operation targeting child trafficking in West Africa has resulted in the rescue of more than 50 child workers and the arrest of eight people in connection with the illegal recruitment of children.”
(Source: Interpol, 03/08/2009, Link)

“The children had been bought by plantation owners needing cheap labour to harvest the cocoa and palm plantations. They were discovered working under extreme conditions, forced to carry massive loads seriously jeopardizing their health.  Aged between 11 and 16, children told investigators they would regularly work 12 hours a day and receive no salary or education. Girls were usually purchased as house maids and would work a seven-day week all year round, often in addition to their duties in the plantations.”
(Source: Interpol, 03/08/2009, Link)

“The children had been bought by plantation owners needing cheap labour to harvest the cocoa and palm plantations. They were discovered working under extreme conditions, forced to carry massive loads seriously jeopardizing their health.  Aged between 11 and 16, children told investigators they would regularly work 12 hours a day and receive no salary or education. Girls were usually purchased as house maids and would work a seven-day week all year round, often in addition to their duties in the plantations.”
(Source: Interpol, 03/08/2009, Link)

We don’t necessarily need to adopt total fair trade, but simply adopt some of the good practices into the normal supply chain, some of the elements of the success of fair trade mirror elements of good practice unconventional chains, including longer-term relations between producer and buyer, transfer of knowledge between the two and fair trading practices”
(Source: Interpol, 03/08/2009, Link)

A’bidah Zaid @abidahzsx
finished watching “the dark side of chocolate” and did some research. no more hersheys and nestle for me. ):
(Source: Twitter, 20/10/2012, Link)

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