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The Dark Side of Chocolate

FULL TITLE – The Dark Side of Chocolate
YEAR OF PUBLICATION – 2010
TYPE AND DURATION – Film (46:32)
MAKERS, AUTHORS, PRODUCERS, ARTISTS –A film by Miki Mistrati & U. Roberto Romano, Executive Producer Helle Faber
PRODUCTION COMPANY – Bastard Film & TV
AVAILABILITY  – Free online (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Vfbv6hNeng)

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Description

Is the chocolate we eat produced with the use of child labour and trafficked children?  The award winning Danish journalist Miki Mistrati decides to investigate the rumors. While we enjoy the sweet taste of chocolate, the reality is strikingly different for African children. In 2001 consumers around the world were outraged to discover that child labor and slavery, trafficking, and other abuses existed on cocoa farms in the Ivory Coast, a country that produces nearly half the world’s cocoa. An avalanche of negative publicity and consumer demands for answers and solutions soon followed. Two members of US Congress, Senator Tom Harkin of Iowa and Representative Eliot Engel of New York, tackled the issue by adding a rider to an agricultural bill proposing a federal system to certify and label chocolate products as slave free. The measure passed the House of Representatives and created a potential disaster for Cargill, Archer Daniels Midland Mars, Hershey’s, Nestle, Barry Callebaut, Saf-Cacao and other chocolate manufacturers. To avoid legislation that would have forced chocolate companies to label their products with “no child labor” labels (for which many major chocolate manufacturers wouldn’t qualify), the industry fought back and finally agreed to a voluntary protocol to end abusive and forced child labor on cocoa farms by 2005. The chocolate industry fought back. Ultimately, a compromise was reached to end child labor on Ivory Coast cocoa farms by 2005. In 2005 the cocoa industry failed to comply with the protocol’s terms, and a new deadline for 2008 was established. In 2008 the terms of the protocol were still not met, and yet another deadline for 2010 was set. Almost a decade after the chocolate companies, concerned governments and specially foundations spent millions of dollars in an effort to eradicate child labor and trafficking in the international cocoa trade, has anything changed? Miki Mistrati and U Roberto Romano launch a behind-the-scenes investigation and verify if these allegations of child labor in the chocolate industry are present today. –
Source: Link

His hunt for answers brings him to Mali in West Africa, where hidden footage reveals illegal trafficking of small children to the cocoa fields in neighbouring Ivory Coast.  Kids as young as seven years old work illegal in the plantations where they face a dangerous job cutting down the cocoa and carrying heavy loads.  Some are victims of trafficking and most of the kids are never paid. The West African country of Ivory Coast is the worlds largest producer of cocoa with more than 40% of the worlds production. Companies like Nestle, Barry Callebaut and Mars signed the Cocoa Protocol in 2001 promising to work for a total aradication of child labour in to cocoa sector by 2008. Does your favourite chocolate have a bitter taste?  Follow Miki Mistrati into the bush of Africa to expose; The Dark Side Of Chocolate.
Source: Mistrati 2010. Link

“Trafficked children working in Western African cocoa farms face some of the most hazardous and exhausting working conditions. Child slaves work excessive hours, are forced to do highly repetitive tasks, spray pesticides with no protection, are subjected to physical abuse from overseers, and receive little or no health care.”
Source: Nagle 2008. Link

Chocolate may be our most accessible vice. Unlike caffeine, nicotine, alcohol or sex, it is the fix we can buy, store, transport and consume anywhere, all day long. But most of the chocolate available to us is bad, gastronomically and morally.
Source – Unknown

The Global chocolate and cocoa industry condemns the use of forced or indentured child labour in the cocoa supply chain. Furthermore, it is our hope that anyone associated with Bastard TV Production, who may have witnessed such conduct took it upon themselves to immediately contact the proper authorities. In West Africa, 90% of cocoa is grown on small family farms. In Cote d’Ivoire alone, over 600,000 families live in some of the most remote parts of the country and depend on cocoa for their livelihood. The vast majority of cocoa farms are not owned by the companies that make chocolate or supply cocoa and we therefore don’t have direct control over cocoa farming and labour practices. Before our work began nearly a decade ago, there was little understanding of the nature of working practices in Cote d’Ivoire, but a clear commitment by the industry that children should not be working on cocoa farms at the expense of their schooling or exposed to potentially hazardous farm tasks. After 7 years of field surveys in the Cote d’Ivoire, independent third party organisations have verified the data and concluded that the incidence of forced child labour is extremely small. For nearly ten years now, the Government of Cote d’Ivoire, Industry, Non-governmental Organisations and a host of other international organisations including the International Cocoa Initiative (ICI) and ILO, have committed vast resources in an unprecedented effort to eliminate the worst forms of child labour from the production of cocoa. Ending these practices begins with changing traditional farming methods U many of which have been conducted for more than 100 years. We collectively have spent more than $75 million and support nearly 40 programmes throughout West Africa that provide cocoa farming families and their communities with the following:

Greater opportunities for economic development
As a result, participating farmers are now earning 20% and in some cases 55% more in income.

Teaching farmers about acceptable labour practices
The International Cocoa Initiative engages with farmers about the dangers cocoa farming children face. This dialogue is central to getting cocoa communities to commit to a lasting change through self-monitoring and community-led farmer outreach. In Campement in the Cote d’Ivoire for example; there has been a 20% fall in children using machetes, 35% fewer children are carrying heavy loads and 25% drop in children spraying pesticides.

Equal access to quality education.

We know that the more time children spend in school, the less time they have to work on the family farm. Therefore, we have programmes dedicated to improving access to traditional schools, improving the quality of education at those schools, and training more teachers to grow the number of schools. Our belief is that no child should ever be harmed in the farming of cocoa. In addition to industry programmes, we remain committed to support government and our global partners in the pursuit of sustainable cocoa farming, helping farmers, families and children achieve a better life.

Statement from the Global Chocolate and Cocoa Industry, 19 January 2010 Link

“While the best way to end labor abuse in the fields us to raise cocoa prices and commit to fair trade certification and monitoring, the big companies are using their collective global market clout to suppress prices and to resist paying fair wages to growers and workers. The major chocolate manufactures, predominantly U.S. based, have had many opportunities to help stabilize the world market at sufficient prices; however, their failure to do so renders these corporations complicit in the child labor scandals in the developing world.”
Source: Nagle 2008. Link

In 2001, consumers around the world were outraged to discover that child labor and slavery, trafficking, and other abuses existed on cocoa farms in the Ivory Coast, a country that produces nearly half the world’s cocoa. An avalanche of negative publicity and consumer demands for answers and solutions soon followed. To avoid legislation that would have forced chocolate companies to label their products with ”no child labor” labels (for which many major chocolate manufacturers wouldn’t qualify), the industry fought back and finally agreed to a voluntary protocol to end abusive and forced child labor on cocoa farms by 2005. The chocolate industry fought back. Ultimately, a compromise was reached to end child labor on Ivory Coast cocoa farms by 2005. In 2005 the cocoa industry failed to comply with the protocol’s terms, and a new deadline for 2008 was established.  In 2008 the terms of the protocol were still not met, and yet another deadline for 2010 was set. Almost a decade after the chocolate companies, concerned governments and specially foundations spent millions of dollars in an effort to eradicate child labor and trafficking in the international cocoa
trade, has anything changed? Miki Mistrati and U Roberto Romano launch a behind-the-scenes investigation and verify if these allegations of child labor in the chocolate industry are present today.
Source: Link

“It appears that now we live in a world in which the rule is inequality for many and prosperity for a few within and between nations; a world in which everything is a commodity with an economic value and a market price to be traded and sold, including our fellow human beings.”
Source: Nagle 2008. Link

The horrendous conditions under which children must toil on the cocoa farms of the Cote d’Ivoire are even more jarring when the facts are juxtaposed with the idea that much of the cocoa will ultimately end up producing something that most people associate with happiness and pleasure: chocolate
Source: Chanthavong 2002 Link

“Globalization and regional integration have contributed to human trafficking becoming the fastest growing and the third most widespread criminal enterprise in the world after drugs and weapons trafficking…The crimes perpetrated by human traffickers constitute egregious human rights abuses and crimes against international law.” Source: Nagle 2008. Link

“Of the cocoa consumed in the United States [in 2005], 59 percent originated the West African nation of Ivory Coast, which supplies more than 38 percent of the world’s cocoa and derives 40 percent of its total export revenues from cocoa exports.”
Source: Nagle 2008. Link

“Ironically, one approach that could succeed may be the one that does not try to attack trafficking as a separate goal, but places it in the larger context of the underlying social and economic problems it exposes. The causes of trafficking, as has been stated, include the low status of women, as well as the weakness or corruption of law enforcement officials and poverty. Successful programs must not only promote government integrity, but must be woven into a larger anti-poverty, sustainable development response.”
Source: Lyday and Adviser 2000 Link

“In 2001, by signing onto what became known as the Harkin-Engel Protocol, U.S. Senator Thomas Harkin and Congressman Eliot Engel challenged the cocoa industry to comply with child labor prohibitions established by the International Labour Organization Convention 182. Following intense negotiations with the major U.S. chocolate companies, the Protocol laid out a series of date-specific actions, including the development of credible, mutually acceptable, voluntary industry wide standards of public certification by July 1 of 2005 to address the worst forms of child and forced labor in the cocoa industry’s worldwide supply chain.”
Source: Nagle 2008. Link

Inspiration / Process / Technique / Method

Video: http://thecnnfreedomproject.blogs.cnn.com/2011/04/06/the-dark-side-of-chocolate/

The Dark Side of Chocolate reveals how nine years after major chocolate companies committed to eliminating abusive child labour, forced labour and trafficking in their cocoa supply chains, these egregious abuses continue in West Africa.
Anon, 2012, Link

In 2001 there was an international cocoa agreement stating:
Members shall give consideration to improving the standard of living and working conditions of populations engaged in the cocoa sector, consistent with their stage of development, bearing in mind internationally recognized principles on these matters. Furthermore, Members agree that labour standards shall not be used for protectionist trade purposes.
European Commission, 2010, Link
The main inspiration of the film is to end the plight of nearly two million children toiling in child or forced labour in the cocoa fields.
Source: Global Exchange, 2011, Link

The crew interview both proponents and opponents of these alleged practices, and use hidden camera techniques to delve into the gritty world of cocoa plantations
Source: McGraw-Herdeg, 2010, Link

Cacao can only grow in hot, wet climates, which tend to be where the world’s poorest live, within 20 degrees either side of the equator. Harvesting techniques have barely changed since Aztec days: workers use knives to hack the ripe pods from trees, careful not to damage the bark. Then they split the pods by whacking them with mallets, and scrape out the beans and sticky pulp. The good news is that cacao provides a livelihood for 50 million people worldwide. The bad news is that many are exploited, which is why the Fairtrade label was launched.
Bell, 2012, Link

“The idea for the film came about from a visit to my local supermarket where I’d gone to buy some chocolate,” Mistrati said. “I saw a variety of chocolate bars and one of them had the Fair Trade mark on it, so I began to wonder, if one was Fair Trade what about the other six chocolate bars?”
Moussly, 2012, Link

Discussions / Responses

This film effectively explains the economic and practical aspects of the production of chocolate and exposes the industry’s continuing reliance on child labor. The hidden-camera work creates a sense of immediacy and allows viewers to feel as if they, too, are thrashing through the underbrush at a cocoa plantation.—Joan Pedzich, formerly with Harris Beach PLLC, Pittsford, NY (Source: Pedzich 2012 np Link)

Fairtrade is working as hard as possible to play an even more proactive role towards the elimination of the worst forms of child labour. No person or organisation is currently able to guarantee 100% that, in the context of endemic poverty and insecurity in many developing countries, child labour will never occur. Fairtrade guarantees that through our standards, our certification, our producer support and our work to strengthen farmers’ organisations to implement community-owned programmes, we will do everything we can to tackle it on a progressive basis, and to secure both the livelihoods of farmers and the wellbeing of children. Cadbury’s response in relation to this issue of child labour: Cadbury takes the issue of child labour very seriously, and is wholly committed to eliminating it. Through our investment in the Cadbury Cocoa Partnership and our partnership with Fairtrade, our aim is to enable farmers to live and work in thriving cocoa communities for the long term. This means supporting farmers to increase their incomes from cocoa and other crops, to improve life in cocoa villages and to tackle issues including child labour. We are investing £45 million over 10 years into cocoa sustainability and one of the key themes for our investment is to eliminate child labour. We are also strong supporters and funders of the International Cocoa Initiative, who have been leaders in developing best practice to tackle the root causes of child labour in West Africa. (Source: Kavokiva 2010 np Link)

I sat there next to my 14-year-old cousin who was among the first to raise his hand when asked if anyone was angry after seeing the documentary. Films like these are truly to be accredited for the daring and oftentimes dangerous lengths they go to to explain to us visually the harsh realities of our world today. Hagemann’s feelings of helplessness can be shared by many when facing such a vast and worldwide problem. There are, however, small steps in which we as consumers (and downright concerned human beings) can take that positively impact the chocolate industry. Steps like purchasing Fair Trade Certified chocolate or urging major chocolate companies to do so can help in ensuring that cocoa farmers are receiving a fair price for their harvest and that slavery is not being used in the process. (Source: León 2010 np Link)

While the topic is very sad and disturbing, the documentary itself is lacking. The film plays mostly as a series of clips from investigative journalist fieldwork and lacks a strong supporting body of research. – Josh Heier – April 2, 2012 (Source: Heier 2012 np Link)

This documentary has an important theme. People often talk about the diamond industry, the oil industry etc.. but often people don’t talk about the cocoa industry because no one wants to pay a dollar extra in the Global North for their chocolate fix. Chocolate is not produced in the west, however, candy bars, hot chocolate etc.. is sold for about $1 (or less), and a child is forcibly trafficked in order to produce that bar for several years. It’s sad how the government is a part of the problem. Overall though, refreshing documentary. – Sitinga Kachipande – December 31, 2011(Source: Kachipande 2011 np Link)

Nestle called the police at the end for stop the film, that’s bullshit..
hate this company, never gonna have their products
the people who did_ this documentary,… Congratulations… You did a Great Things.. xxx (Source: Jomon KJ 2012 np Link)

YOU REALLY THINK THAT BOYCOTTING WILL CHANGE ANYTHING???? IT’S JUST GOING TO CREATE MORE PROBLEMS AND WORSE YOU’LLL BE BARKING AT THE WRONG STUPID TREE YOU PIECE OF SHIT (Source: Badfoody 2012 np Link)

So you’re saying we should support child slavery or billions of people will lose their livelihoods.
So you’re trying to_ justify child slavery. (SheepIn6Flavours Source: 2012 np Link)

oh ya so I stop buying and everybody boycotts chocolate. a billion farmers lose their jobs, a billion companies crash. Ivory Coast loses 90% of its economy. Boycotting isn’t the damn answer, you stupid shallow liberal_ cunt (Source: Badfoody 2012 np Link)

I think it’s a lot better than getting in a huff because others won’t fall in line, conform and tolerate child slavery being a part of their daily lives the way you_ expect others to. Honestly, what the hell is the problem with someone making the choice to not buy these products? Don’t you think people have the right to choose what they want to buy without having their reasons conform with your preferences? (Source: SheepIn6Flavours 2012 np Link)

No, they can’t be blissfully unaware of what’s happening, because you *can* track where your product comes from right down to the farmer. Because megacorps *can* learn which farms the middleman gets his stuff from, and send in people to go inspect those farms. Because megacorps *can* use their money to arm-twist and bully smaller farmers and producers in all fields to do what they want. Which is_ what megacorps do most of the time. Except now, when it makes you look bad. (Source: SheepIn6Flavours 2012 np Link)

Logisitics: You contact an Exporter, who can do all the other stuff you don’t have to worry about, next you buy from the Exporter. DONE. Yes Nestle can be blissfully unaware of what’s happening, Why? Cause they have completely nothing to do with it BECAUSE OF THE DAMN EXPORTERS. What? you think they have receipts for buying enslaved kids? Do you think they have notices that say :hey WE HAVE SLAVE KIDS_ WORKING ON OUR FARMS. Screw you, people like you don’t know how to fix problems (Source: Badfoody 2012 np Link)

Semantics. Are you going to try to convince me that an international corporation can’t track down to the farm where the cocoa beans they buy come from? That Nestle can control 12 percent of the world’s economy yet be blissfully and conveniently unaware that their product is made from child labor even though McDonald’s is able to commandeer and control most of the large apple farms in the U.S. for their stupid pies? Do you not know how_ businesses run? (Source: SheepIn6Flavours 2012 np Link)

Kathy
We’ve skirted our Child Labor Laws buy having made outside the USA. Why do people turn child slave labor into American politics? The sugar industry had the same allegations and Americans boycotted, complained, etc to try to stop it. Back to article, how do you find and buy chocolate that is produced fairly? If the majority of you spent time emailing Hersheys and other manufacturers it would do some good. Obama, Palin and the rest have NOTHING to do with this. We do as consumers. April 10, 2011 at 2:40 pm | (Source: Kathy 2011 np Link)

Stephanie
Wow, what a maroon! You are so totally off the mark of this article.
I love chocolate, I would prefer that people get paid what they are worth and that children not be forced to work long, hard hours to help their families survive. Reality bites.
I will be more conscious of fair trade chocolate! April 7, 2011 at 11:17 am (Source: Stephanie 2011 np Link)

NYC Conservative
If we were to stop eating and buying products that are produced in foreign countries using slave/child labor we would be left in the dark ages. So many countries use this labor and it should be our problem. How about people stop procreating in these countries and then there will be no child labor. So, no more chocolate in the world, no more coffee and tea, no more clothing.
Fair trade companies? I think if you ask the child doing the labor and feeding housing themselves with the pay, as small as it is, would disagree and beg us to keep buying. We, as Americans do not even take care of our own citizens but yet we are to reach out and help others? All the money donated to Japan could have helped when the debris washed up on US soil or when the nuclear fallout destroys all the fish and food for the US. But, no the bleeding hearts only think with emotions and not commonsense for the long haul. Child labor? I say give me my friggin chocolate April 7, 2011 at 12:03 pm |(Source: NYC Conservative 2011 np Link)

Solo • 10 months ago
Thanks everyone, who made/make any effort to change this horrible situation! I will share this movie with all my friends! I will also write a letter to Nestle & etc companies with a message, that I stop buying their products! I will purchase Fair-trade chocolate from now! People from all over the world, let unite! When there is unity, there is power! (Source: Solo 2011 np Link)

Th111 • 2 years ago
I wrote to Nestle, Mars & KRAFT to let them know I will not purchase any products until accountability is exercised and social wrongs are corrected. I advised friends and family to do the same. Billions of dollars and “no” power, welcome to the dark side. 10/10 (Source: Th111 2010 np Link)

Gary V • a year ago
A fascinating but disturbing doc. How can things like this still go on? No responsible company can say that it is not accountable for every stage of the manufacturing of their products. Yet again we see that money is more important than Human lives, but how many of us who have seen this doc will say how disgusting it is but still go on buying chocolate & perpetuate these crimes against Humanity. It will probably only be a week or two before most of us forget what is happening in these countries & continue to support this evil trade in child slaves. (Source: Gary V 2011 np Link)

Lucas Dawkins
Another example of slaves in poor countries, making the first-world corporations rich, and powerful to the point of them being untouchable. I’m ashamed of the human race. (Source: Lucas Dawkins 2012 np Link)

Reflectivemood
A sad and very sobering documentary. Yet another example that slavery is still around us in the 21 century. (Source: Reflectivemood 2012 np Link)

Samuel Ford
Just another example of capitalism in action. International companies profiting off the poor economic state of another third world nation where the government does not protect the rights of the lower classes due to the fear of losing big business which probably accounts for the majority of their exports. Their predicament is partially due to a history of imperialistic/capitalistic ideology’s that have occurred in the region. Placing the blame on their culture would not be completely accurate. When there is widespread poverty comes down to the survival of the fittest. All that aside, the key point to this film was corporate responsibility which is really just a form of consumer responsibility. Business will continue as usual as long as it is more profitable to do so. (Source: Samuel Ford 2011 np Link)

Jack1952
Capitalism is driven by the need for maximum profit. Nestle can choose to not do business in those countries or insist that they treat their workers with dignity. They don’t because the profits they need are maximized by treating workers in an unscrupulous manner. (Source: Jack1952 2011 np Link)

Jack1952
Chocolate is the product centered out in the documentary. Unfortunately, almost every product one can name has a dark history behind it. It would almost be impossible to buy only products where workers have not been severely exploited. It is the reality of a global economy that has its roots in capitalism (Source: Jack1952 2011 np Link)

“In the modern world journalism is very important because it has a big impact on how people react,” Mistrati said. “For me, an NGO report is good but at the end of the day it’s important to show people how things are for real. So this was my issue, trying to find out if there was really child trafficking going on in West Africa.” (Source: Moussly 2012 np Link)

Outcomes / Impacts

Miki Mistrati claims his film, The Dark Side of Chocolate, has coaxed major chocolate makers out of their apathy towards the use of trafficked children in cocoa plantations.
(Source: Responsible Cocoa, 2011, Link )

“Ending these practices begins with changing traditional farming methods – many of which have been conducted for more than 100 years. We collectively have spent more than $75 million and support nearly 40 programmes throughout West Africa”
(Source: Responsible Cocoa, 2011, Link )

“Our belief is that no child should ever be harmed in the farming of cocoa. In addition to industry programme, we remain committed to support government and our global partners in the pursuit of sustainable cocoa farming, helping farmer, families and children achieve a better life.”
(Source: Responsible Cocoa, 2011, Link )

In September 2010 a new Framework of Action partnership agreement was created between the US Department of Labour, ILO and industry. The global chocolate and cocoa industry has made an immediate pledge to commit $7 million to further the goals of the Harkin-Engle Protocol and the Frameowrk of Action.
(Source: Responsible Cocoa, 2011, Link )

“Achieving this objective is possible only through partnership among the major stakeholders: governments, global industry (comprised of major manufacturers of cocoa and chocolate products as well as other major cocoa users), cocoa producers, organised labour, non-governmental organisations, and consumers. Each partner has important responsibilities.”
(Source: Chocolate Manufacturers Association, 1999, Link)

“Industry recognizes the ILO’s unique expertise and welcomes it’s involvement in addressing this serious problem. The ILO must have…an active role in assessing, monitoring, reporting on, and remedying the worst forms of child labour in the growing and processing of cocoa beans and their derivative products.”
(Source: Chocolate Manufacturers Association, 1999, Link)

“Industry has publically acknowledged the problem of forced child labour in West Africa and will continue to commit significant resources to address it. West African nations also have acknowledged the problem and have taken steps under their own laws to stop the practice.”
(Source: Chocolate Manufacturers Association, 1999, Link)

“By December 1, 2001, a joint statement made by the major stakeholders will recognize, as a matter of urgency, the need to end the worst forms of child labour in connection with the growing and processing of West African cocoa beans and the derivative products and the need to identify positive developmental alternatives for the children removed from the worst forms of child labour.”
(Source: Chocolate Manufacturers Association, 1999, Link)

“By July 1, 2002, industry will establish a joint international foundation to oversee and sustain efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labour in the growing and processing of cocoa beans and their derivative products.”
(Source: Chocolate Manufacturers Association, 1999, Link)

“the industry in partnership with other major stakeholders will develop and implement credible, mutually-acceptable, voluntary, industry-wide standards of public certification, consistent with applicable federal law, that cocoa beans and their derivative products have been grown and/or processed without any of the worst forms of child labour.”
(Source: Chocolate Manufacturers Association, 1999, Link)

“INTERPOL’s first ever police operation targeting child trafficking in West Africa has resulted in the rescue of more than 50 child workers and the arrest of eight people in connection with the illegal recruitment of children.”
(Source: Interpol, 03/08/2009, Link)

“The children had been bought by plantation owners needing cheap labour to harvest the cocoa and palm plantations. They were discovered working under extreme conditions, forced to carry massive loads seriously jeopardizing their health.  Aged between 11 and 16, children told investigators they would regularly work 12 hours a day and receive no salary or education. Girls were usually purchased as house maids and would work a seven-day week all year round, often in addition to their duties in the plantations.”
(Source: Interpol, 03/08/2009, Link)

“The children had been bought by plantation owners needing cheap labour to harvest the cocoa and palm plantations. They were discovered working under extreme conditions, forced to carry massive loads seriously jeopardizing their health.  Aged between 11 and 16, children told investigators they would regularly work 12 hours a day and receive no salary or education. Girls were usually purchased as house maids and would work a seven-day week all year round, often in addition to their duties in the plantations.”
(Source: Interpol, 03/08/2009, Link)

We don’t necessarily need to adopt total fair trade, but simply adopt some of the good practices into the normal supply chain, some of the elements of the success of fair trade mirror elements of good practice unconventional chains, including longer-term relations between producer and buyer, transfer of knowledge between the two and fair trading practices”
(Source: Interpol, 03/08/2009, Link)

A’bidah Zaid @abidahzsx
finished watching “the dark side of chocolate” and did some research. no more hersheys and nestle for me. ):
(Source: Twitter, 20/10/2012, Link)

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